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Dad’s Hack To Save Halloween With “Candy Chute” Goes Viral

COVID-19 has taken a lot from us. Some good (work from home solitude), but a lot more bad. Now it’s looking like Halloween could be taken from us.

Until this dad came to the rescue.

Andrew Beattie loves Halloween. The horror-film fan has spooky memorabilia around the home that gets some special attention during the season.

Now, Andrew Beattie is looking COVID-19 right in the eyes and saying “Challenge accepted” because he just invented a pandemic-friendly Halloween hack.

Beattie made a six-foot candy chute out of an Amazon delivery tube. The point of the tube is to provide contact-less Trick or Treating for kids and their families. The kids place their bags under the chute and Beattie will let the candy slide.

In his Facebook post, Beattie reassures parents that a lot of effort was put in to make things safe for all participants:

Our 6' candy chute is ready to be attached to the handrail! Come on, Halloween!!! 🎃👻🧙Edit #1: a quick update, since...

Posted by Andrew Beattie on Saturday, September 12, 2020

“This will be a completely “touch-free” experience for trick or treaters. There will be a sign at the bottom of the tube showing them where to hold their bags and buckets so the candy can drop right in. I, personally, will be wearing a mask and changing gloves frequently, and the candy will be from a factory-sealed bag that I’ll open outside by the candy chute.”

The Beattie family recently put the candy chute to the test, and we have a winner!

My girls trying out the candy chute! Thank you so much for all the support, folks! We are truly blessed! #HalloweenHillbilly

Posted by Andrew Beattie on Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Additionally, the invention benefits those with mobility constraints. Trick or Treaters no longer have to walk up the stairs to get their treats.

Beattie’s Facebook post has 80k shares, 34k likes and nearly 10k comments as of this writing. Since his post went viral, Beattie’s invention has been featured in BuzzFeed News and USA Today. Beattie posted on Facebook that he is “humbled” by the entire experience and everyone’s reactions.